27th Jul 2015

As its name suggests, the Federal Litigation Section is made up of lawyers who have litigation and dispute resolution practices in federal courts and tribunals.

 But it is also much more than that. Its real areas of activity may be seen from an outline of its committee structure. This is where all the work is done and all the action takes place.

This is litigation that in the federal court system as opposed to the state court system. The rules, regulations and procedures are different than the state court. This is why it is paramount that you have an attorney who is well versed in the federal court system and knows the rules, regulations and procedures. Most attorneys are not well versed in the federal court system and shy away from it, because it is so different from state court.

You need to talk to a lawyer as soon as you are aware of any federal investigation concerning you or your business, or as soon as you are sued in federal court. The cost to represent you will vary, depending upon the nature of the allegations, the amount involved, how important it is to you, what you want accomplished, whether it’s criminal or civil, and if loss of freedom is involved.

A federal case can be any matter, even civil, criminal or both. The important aspect is if it in the federal court system it is a federal case. The federal civil cases are similar to state court civil matters except that they’re in the federal court system and must abide by the federal rules, regulations and procedures for civil matters. The federal criminal cases usually are what we know as “white-collar crime” or involve bodily harm or threats to the U.S. Government or federal employees. These cases must abide by the federal rules, regulations and procedures for criminal matters.

The purpose of the Federal Litigation Section shall be to further the purposes of the Association as stated in its Constitution and to concentrate on the fundamental practice of law in the federal courts. The field of federal court trial practice shall be monitored by committees focused on federal rules of procedure, trial and appellate practice.